Tag Archives: concrete

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Building a Water Feature

Amid this lingering heatwave, simply looking at a freshwater feature in the backyard is a visual delight. Dipping your toes and listening to the sound of the water trickling is even more enjoyable. Here are a few tips on how to build a cool summer refuge.

Begin by digging a hole until you reach the target depth, following the manufacturer’s instructions, then cover the bottom with a 3-5 cm layer of sand. Make sure you take the time to remove anything that may damage the water basin first, like rocks, roots, buried pieces of wood, etc. Continue reading

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Patio Flooring Options

You will need to consider many factors before choosing the right flooring material for your patio, like its resistance, comfort, maintenance, harmony with the outdoor decor and recreational space. Here is an overview of the options available.

Natural stone paving on a bed of sand is very popular. There are so many options to choose from, like granite, slate, limestone, sandstone, etc. This type of flooring pairs very well with the surrounding vegetation, especially if the stones are laid randomly. It creates a very natural look.

Fill out the joints with sand, pebbles, earth (mixed in with sand to prevent collapsing). If possible, try to stay away from mortar to let the rainwater penetrate directly into the ground. The downside: very porous stone is not very resistant to freezing temperatures. In addition, it stains easily. Continue reading

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Totally Contemporary

Some believe this design is too cold. Yet, it seems the contemporary style offers continuous appeal since so many people choose to adopt it. Even after so many years, these elements are still sought after: clean lines, open spaces, plenty of natural light and decorative furniture.

What’s astonishing when we enter a contemporary-style room is the illusion of a never-ending space. The furniture is often built into the walls and partition walls, the lights are mounted in the ceilings, and the room is bare. Everything is clean, fresh and unadorned.

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Huge windows or even walls made entirely of glass, allow the indoors to expand into the outdoors while flooding the room with natural light. Since the living space is bare and there are windows everywhere, the natural light brightens up the room.

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How to Choose Your Kitchen Island

The kitchen island, once considered an item designed solely for functionality, has become an integral part of home décor. How do you choose from the abundance of materials and functions for this staple item?

The kitchen island has become a key element in almost every modern kitchen, combining style and functionality. There are many options to consider when choosing your kitchen island. Here are some ideas.

Originally, the island consisted of a practical space on which meals were prepared. Eventually, it became a multipurpose piece of furniture that included elements such as a prepping station, sink, dishwasher, stove, small fridge, hot plate, oven, integrated cutting board and even a counter used for enjoying meals.

Furniture is decorative – and the kitchen island is no exception. Some kitchens have massive islands made of high-quality wood, anchored with sturdy legs, adorned with decorative detailing, topped with grill paneling or comprised of frosted glass when used as a storage unit. The island is the central focus point of the space, often standing out in comparison to other pieces in the kitchen. Continue reading

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Glass, the material of the future

The future doesn’t just belong to ecomaterial. Glass is the shining example.

Initially, i.e. many centuries ago, glass was not very transparent or resistant. Scientific progress allowed glass to gain in transparency and strength. That is why the manufacturing of glass requires a great deal of energy because the transformation temperature is high. It emits CO2, heavy metals and polluting gases in industrial quantities.

Glass is far behind wood, stone, earth or straw in terms of ecological materials. However, it is far ahead of the pet peeves of ecologists: PVC, aluminium and even steel. Continue reading