Tag Archives: chandelier


A flood of silver in four walls

Household silver doesn’t go out of style. Centuries pass and it never loses its elegance. And if silver is spread throughout the room, the entire décor is filled with reflections and glimmerings. You allow yourself to be taken away by a wave of ease and comfort.

There was a time when castles around the world contained silver furniture. The furniture would be melted when cash was short. Silver in a residence was an undeniable sign of richness. And that hasn’t changed.

You usually find the classic pieces of silver in your dining room: utensils, napkin rings, mustard pot, sugar bowl, salt and pepper shakers, cheese plate, spice box, casserole dish, and creamer.

However, many accessories can be scattered around all rooms to create a river of silver: candy dish, jewellery box, tea box, fruit basket, candleholder, lamp, flowerpot, coffeepot, knickknack, blotter, inkwell, small storage case, flower stand, cookie jar, sugar bowl, water jug, wine jar, beer stein, shaker, dessert plate, dinner service, phials and flasks, chandeliers and shades. Continue reading

Human bones reused

Sedlec Ossuary (Wikipedia)

My girlfriend was visiting a church in Linz, in northern Austria. I was waiting for her outside. An Austrian friend strongly recommended that we visit the building. “You have to see it,” she said.

“You’ll never guess what I saw,” my girlfriend said as she came out of the church. “I was amazed to see such beautiful sculptures. It looked like lace. When I got closer to the pieces, I noticed that human bones were the base for the detailed sculpture work!”

She was quite shaken up.

Last year she visited a chapel in the Mauricie region. As she got closer to the relics, she jumped when she saw bones, hair, nails and teeth mounted like works of art: jewels, sculptures, objects in doll houses, etc. She thought that the relics were just objects touched by an illustrious person, not human body parts!

So far, neither of these discoveries have much to do with real estate, but we’re slowly getting there.

In the same year, a young owner told us that he called the police because he found bones in the walls of the ancestral home that he and his girlfriend were renovating. The neighbours were quite curious about the police presence in this quiet corner of Nicolet.

The young woman and her boyfriend learned that the bones were animal. They were often used at the time for insulation. Horse manes and tails were also used. People used whatever was handy at the time. Continue reading

The magic touch

Chandeliers have symbolized luxury and wealth since time immemorial. You probably can’t resist a chandelier that shines with a thousand lights. Isn’t it magic?

Chandeliers from yesterday to today.

According to Wikipedia, in the Middle Ages chandeliers were held by a chain or rope that could be descended to light candles set on branches of wood.

Source: iStockphoto. All rights reserved.

Metal chandeliers appeared in the XVth century*. Their more impressive new shapes made them symbols of luxury. The addition of prisms and crystal pendants became popular three centuries later. In the XIXth century, gas lighting replaced candles for less than a century before the advent of electric bulbs.

When you take an interest in world history, you often discover differences. For example, in North Africa, the biggest chandelier in a mosque has been housed in the Great Mosque of Taza since about the 12th century*. The 3.2 tonne delicately worked bronze chandelier is cone-shaped. It is 2.5 metres wide and 4 m high. Originally, passers-by were dazzled by 514 oil-filled chalices (godets). Today, the godets have been replaced with electric light.

Other famous chandeliers dazzle the world. Continue reading