Veranda, Sunlight and Warmth

It increases the value of the property by adding an extra room. It lets in plenty of sunlight. It reduces the energy bill by trapping in heat. It enhances the look of the exterior. Are you thinking about a veranda? Then, you’re absolutely right.

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iStock

This space, called a veranda, features large windows and was unpopular among the baby boomers. It looked old-fashioned, so they said. The ecological trend has changed that mindset. Besides trapping in heat during the day and dispersing it throughout the house at night, the veranda pleases plant-lovers too. It’s the ideal place to grow many plant species.

From the practical perspective, a well-equipped veranda can easily become a dining area, a reading space, an office, a place to play board games, listen to music or watch a movie. It can even include an indoor pool.

Another great advantage: the veranda opens the home to the outdoors, thus increasing the quality of life. The contemplative kind will appreciate its wide and open space (especially in the country), the possibility to watch birds, to gaze at the moon and enjoy sunrises and sunsets.

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iStock

You are concerned about excessive heat in the summer, repeated glare in your eyes, loss of privacy from neighbouring homes, a defacement of the exterior? All of these reasons are no longer current. Innovative technologies from the last 20 years regarding smart homes and home connectivity have changed things.

Before going any further, please remember that only a well-built veranda will increase the value of your property. Adding a simple shoddy glass room will only bring you problems and a waste of money.

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iStock

Blending the veranda with the rest of the home, aesthetically speaking, is the biggest challenge. This is an important factor to consider. Ask for advice, read on the subject or, if possible, hire an expert. Here’s a little tip: if using wood to build the structure, you can’t go wrong. It pairs well with all styles.

Ideally, the veranda should be built next to the kitchen or living room. Otherwise, it might just become a simple extension. You should orient it depending on its use. In short, you’ll want it to face west to watch the sunset and feel warmth throughout the evening; to face east to watch the sunrise and feel warmth up until the afternoon. What’s the best option? The veranda facing south-east or south-west, although some homeowners prefer it facing north.

The market offers so many varieties of glass that comfort is now welcome in the veranda: insulating glass, tempered glass, double and triple glazing, glazing with an integrated film, high-performance acoustic glazing, self-cleaning glass.

Remember, the larger the surface made to open, the lower the risk for extreme heat. This may include a sunroof. Blinds, curtains and adjustable shutters will reduce the greenhouse effect as well. Ecological insulators are useful because they allow the house to breathe. One tip: using warm colours inside the veranda will absorb the solar heat.

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iStock

Motorized exterior blinds, closing by remote control or another mechanism, ensure a good level of intimacy. Otherwise, landscaping and even a privacy screen or mobile screen can provide additional privacy.

As for its structure, aluminum, steel and wood are the preferred materials. Wood is strongly recommended for its ecological value. Furthermore, it absorbs outdoor noises.

You don’t have to install roof glass panels for the veranda. The roof doesn’t have to be transparent. The chosen material, however, must blend with the rest of the house.

 

Images: iStock.com

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