Archives pour l'étiquette roof

Veranda, Sunlight and Warmth

It increases the value of the property by adding an extra room. It lets in plenty of sunlight. It reduces the energy bill by trapping in heat. It enhances the look of the exterior. Are you thinking about a veranda? Then, you’re absolutely right.

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This space, called a veranda, features large windows and was unpopular among the baby boomers. It looked old-fashioned, so they said. The ecological trend has changed that mindset. Besides trapping in heat during the day and dispersing it throughout the house at night, the veranda pleases plant-lovers too. It’s the ideal place to grow many plant species.

From the practical perspective, a well-equipped veranda can easily become a dining area, a reading space, an office, a place to play board games, listen to music or watch a movie. It can even include an indoor pool. Continuer la lecture

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Sustainable Homes Love Cork

A plant product that is sustainable, recyclable and rot-proof: cork is sought after as a floor covering and is considered one of the most efficient insulating material for walls, doors, roofs and floors. In addition, it looks beautiful and inviting. In short, it’s a God-given product.

Let’s start with the basics. Cork is often used as a subfloor for a hardwood or floating floor because of its sound and crush-resistant properties and its elasticity. A more discreet role, but an efficient one, nonetheless.

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Far from being unattractive, cork is most usually used above ground, in the form of slabs, as a flooring material. It has numerous qualities. It is flexible, effective against vibrations, soft to the touch, and pleasant to look at. A dozen shades, if not more, are available on the market. Continuer la lecture

Insulating the Eco-Friendly Way

We are expecting a typical Québec winter this year. That means cold weather, snow storms, and humidity. Should you reconsider your home’s insulation? If so, this is the perfect occasion to take your first Eco-friendly step. Plus, you will save on heating costs.

Good insulation means improved comfort, protection against outside noise and energy efficiency; hence, the importance of having an adequate insulation system.

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First off, here is some basic knowledge. Since hot air tends to rise to make room for the cold air that is flowing down, the roof’s insulation is a top priority. Do not overlook the insulation of the piping system, even if it seems trivial. And remember, properly installed insulation means zero heat loss; therefore, no seams nor openings.

According to many experts, ecological insulation materials are more energy efficient than mineral wool insulators. You can expect less condensation because the ecological insulator is more breathable. In addition, they are less irritating to the skin during the installation. Ecological insulators are not as energy intensive to make as mineral wool, with a few exceptions. Continuer la lecture

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Buying an Ecological Home Is Profitable

This article is intended for two types of buyers. Those who favour the resale value of the property they want to buy and those who wish to go green and buy a sustainable and ecological home, usually Gen Y first-time buyers (Millenials).

Who would have thought that we would see the words “ecological” and “profitable” in the same sentence someday? Within the next 20 years, sustainable and ecological homes will see their value increase. They have a good resale potential.

Ecological homes have many characteristics. First off, its size is equivalent to the household’s needs, it contains healthy and sustainable materials, its energy consumption (heating and cooling) is considerably reduced and its materials have a high recycling potential.

According to Écohabitation, metal roofs, made of painted or galvanized steel, have a life expectancy of more than 50 years. They require no maintenance and are 100% recyclable. Wood, composite wood, and EPDM roofs are almost as durable. Other materials are also recommended, but stay away from asphalt shingles! Continuer la lecture

Before you knock down a wall

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Many of us dream of expanding a room the easy way: by knocking down a wall. It’s not a bad idea, but it does require a careful examination of the building structure.

A loadbearing wall is an outside wall that supports a building’s roof structure—the gable wall for example—and the floor structure. When the wall is part of the frame, it’s called a loadbearing wall.

Loadbearing walls are built solidly with resistant materials. Their static function forces them to bear weight at all times.

Used only to separate rooms, interior walls are generally called partitions. For obvious reasons, they’re built lighter than loadbearing walls. Continuer la lecture