Archives pour l'étiquette debt

Thinkstockphoto

Buying your first home before 30

We used your questions and comments as inspiration to talk about 2 things that especially concern young adults when it comes to housing.      

  1. I’d like to buy a home within 5 years, should I make sure to pay off my student loan first?

No. In fact, accelerated repayment is rarely advantageous because student loans are generally amortized over 10 years, the rate is low, and interest is tax deductible.

The debt you should prioritize is consumer debt (credit cards, lines of credit, personal loans, etc.). You can reconcile your big plans with debt repayment: Follow the guide.

Continuer la lecture

iStock

A Guide to Group Buying

Has the thought of buying a property with someone else or with a few people ever crossed your mind? It’s actually possible, but the experience requires discipline.

Buying a property collectively with a relative, either a friend or a family member, is often the ideal solution, especially since access to a property appears to be getting sparse these days. The constraints are numerous: a tightening of mortgage rules, a record high in household debts and difficulties in establishing a budget.

It’s a simple matter of mathematics. The more people are paying for a property, the lesser the amount each one has to pay for it. However, as any other joint enterprise, there are risks. Several things must be taken care of, such as contribution amounts, task distribution as well as the temperament of each and every one.

Hence, the importance of sticking to a protocol, not only to achieve the ultimate goal, which is buying a property, but also to prevent the relationships between the co-owners from going sour.

Erica Nielson, from the RBC Bank, offers advice to help you make your group purchase a success and not a source of problems.

Here is precisely her advice: Continuer la lecture

Can the value of a home replace an RRSP?

According to TD Bank Group, the answer is no. « Even if selling your home is a great way to increase your retirement income, and unless you want to adopt a much simpler lifestyle, it probably won’t generate enough money for your entire retirement. It’s important to have access to savings funds and additional investments, such as an RRSP, a TFSA, pension benefits or shares, » states a press release where, in conjunction with a questionnaire, the institution unveils the results of a survey on beliefs about retirement in Quebec.

It’s true that the net worth of a home represents a significant amount. Until recently a house could provide the owner with a comfortable cushion, but that no longer holds true today. Continuer la lecture