Tag Archives: colour

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Green for Open-Air Living

At this time of year, the vegetation’s green colour is at its best: tender, pure, intense, bright. As we see this brand new greenery pop through our windows, we wonder why we haven’t spread it indoors. Today is the day we stop wondering and we just do it.

Green is soothing, a quality much appreciated in a child’s bedroom. Green is purifying, which makes it an ideal colour for the bathroom and the kitchen; but, especially the bathroom where blue and white, combined with the green, create a natural and fresh look. Green also evokes health, spring freshness and good living.

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If the fenestration is abundant, that’s even better because the natural sunlight will give the green more radiance. If you add mouldings, stone and parquet flooring to this decor, you will create the most natural design. Continue reading

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Happiness is blue

Blue is the colour of peace. Its enthusiasts defend it strongly. There’s no comparison in their eyes. Yellow? Too pale, lacks punch. White? Blank, oblivious and completely flat. Green. Makes you feel sick or depressed. And as they say, what is purer and beautiful than a May sky?

For them blue is the colour of love, but a peaceful love. Red? Too intense, too aggressive, too invasive. Blue is long peaceful happiness. It is also the most widely used colour in Quebec households, a title that is likely rivalled by white on occasion.

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Blue is hitting hard again this year. We see its aqua vintage hue everywhere: large surfaces, furniture, rugs, bedding, curtains, dishes, place mats, cushions, storage boxes, shelves. It’s a bluish-grey that reflects gentleness. We saw a place where it covered the floors and walls, doors, and window frames. Everything was shaded in blue from one end to another. Continue reading

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Royal purple

A red purple, a blue purple, a slightly purple sunset, the purple of the mountains on the horizon, the purple sheen caused by intense cold: all of these examples evoke something dark and cold. But is there any other colour in decoration that is richer and more sumptuous than purple?

A mixture of blue and red, purple is the ultimate luxury colour. A room with an omnipresent purple adds splendour to a room, making it brighter. Crimson is its only rival in terms of royalty.

Have you ever seen a padded purple wall or furniture? It’s luxurious, imposing, almost royal. In a bedroom with a four-poster bed and chandeliers, any purple fabric is even better.

Combined with black, purple provides an unsuspected wealth, as long as a river of natural light can enter the room. If not, multiple recessed floodlights provide minimum lighting to avoid a dark and heavy atmosphere. Continue reading

Loft paradise

Often created in decommissioned industrial buildings, lofts offer an immense open space to decorate, a single room whose dimensions are around 500 square metres, with ceilings of up to three metres and more.

Few doors, few walls, often nothing at all. A wave of natural light from the long vertical windows along the wall floods the central space. Added to these windows you sometimes find a windowed façade, skylights or windows on the ceiling.

Wood or steel beams, concrete, brick and metal surfaces are everywhere. And the abandoned vestiges of the building’s past: pulleys, wooden cases, platforms, giant washbasins, air conditioning conduits, steel tables, oversized chimney.

What do you do with this unrefined decor? Make it your home.

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Once the cleaning work is done, the real work starts. Most owners keep traces of the building’s former vocation for decorative purposes. That’s what makes a loft a loft. That’s what separates it from a penthouse.

If partitions are needed for a certain intimacy, they should be as discreet as possible in order to maintain the continuity of the space and let the light flood in. That is why complete walls are rare. Or areas are combined, such as the living room and dining room. Or low walls, mobile screens, opaque or trans lucid panels are added.  

A loft is a paradise for colour. Owners often use colour to divide the space into areas: one dominant colour per area, or one dominant colour on the ground floor and a second on the upper floor, which is usually a mezzanine. Continue reading

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The art of dressing a window

Dressing a window is an overlooked art. Yet, from a white, almost gossamer-like veil to an opaque velvet fabric, curtains contribute greatly to the look of a room.

For the choice of colour, the strong points are the same between the curtain and the room to decorate: contrasting, harmonic or complementary.

A pale and discreet curtain highlights the colour of a wall or another surface that you want to emphasize, such as an artistic wall. This same curtain would overshadow the flashy look of a room that needs to stand out from rest.

However, a dark curtain will add character to a pale, monochrome room. For example, brown has a tonic effect on a deluge of white or cream. Continue reading