Category Archives: Real Estate 101

iStock

The Promise to Purchase for Condominiums

As for any single home, you will have to write a promise to purchase to acquire the condo you wish to buy. Although the content of both forms is similar, the promise to purchase for condominiums includes some particularities. It is in your best interest to know them well.

In the case of a divided co-ownership property, the promise to purchase includes:

  • the cadastral description of your private portion;
  • if the parking lot and storage space are also private portions;
  • the cadastral designations of the parking lot and storage space;
  • the share and cadastral description of the common portions; and,
  • whether the parking lot and storage space are private portions, common portions for restricted use or other; and,
  • the area of the condo’s private portion described in the certificate of location.

Continue reading

iStock

How Important Is Your Home’s Exterior?

Spring is fast approaching. That means many buyers will be looking for their desired home. Sellers, on the other hand, will try to make their property look as alluring as possible. Where to start? With the exterior, of course.

Most sellers will instinctively renovate their home’s interior. However, the buyer’s first visual contact is with the exterior, either directly or through pictures on social media sites.

Most buyers will contact the seller or their real estate broker if they see a picture of a property they like. If the facade and landscaping are unattractive, the buyer may move to the next picture, unless the pictures inside are incredible. If the buyer is physically facing the house, he or she will keep on going and move on to the next property. Continue reading

iStock

Condo Fees and Inspection

Anyone who wishes to buy a condo should analyze these two issues very carefully before taking action: the monthly fees, and the general condition of the building, including the private and the common spaces. Need advice?

Before looking at the monthly fees, let us review the importance of the condo inspection. Many of us believe it is useless to have a condo unit inspected since it is more like an apartment than a single house. Plus, no one has an apartment inspected before renting it. Bad idea!

Specialists in the field know all too well that it is best to have a condo inspected before buying it. Not only the private area but also the common grounds: hallways, staircases, exterior walls, roof, foundations, land, etc. Just like a home purchase, you can demand the right to have the condo inspected in your offer to purchase. Continue reading

iStock

Choose a Home and Deal with Its Surroundings

This happens quite often enough. Some homeowners start off by being very happy with their new purchase, but they end up being disappointed. Is it because the property no longer suits their needs? On the contrary! The problem is the area, the neighbours, the public services. Before buying the property, these homeowners thought it was unnecessary to explore the neighbourhood. Bad idea!

You are so excited to have found the property of your dreams that you immediately sign the papers because you are afraid someone else will buy it. The seller, on the other hand, is happy the house is selling quickly, especially if he gets the price he asked for. With no bad intentions in mind, he exaggerates the advantages that come with buying the home. “How far from downtown Montréal?” “Thirty minutes” (when it actually takes an hour) “Where is the nearest subway station?” “A ten-minute walk, at most!” (by bus, maybe) And so on.

The buyer and the seller are both feeling anxious. They’re in a hurry to close the deal. They create illusions. We believe what we want to believe. It’s normal. Continue reading

iStock

Condominium: The Questions You Need to Ask

You’re willing to accept the inconveniences that come with living in a co-ownership property and you are now ready to start looking for units. Be careful! Buying a condominium is not the same as buying a house.

Are you looking for a divided or undivided condo unit? A new condo or an older one? These are two contrasting realities. A new condominium will be more modern. You might even be able to look at the blueprints of the unit under construction and offer a few of your own ideas. In addition, maintenance costs will be lower since the building is brand new. Keep in mind, however, that you will have to deal with a promoter. Sometimes, he or she tends to make last-minute changes without advising the future owners. Proceed with caution. Here is a question you should ask: Will you have to pay a monthly housing charge? If you are the Eco-friendly type, new housing is more likely to meet your criteria than older buildings, since the materials used are more current. Continue reading